The WISE Team

Research

Marcia Linn

Marcia Linn

WISE Director

Marcia is a Professor of Development and Cognition, specializing in science and technology in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of the National Academy of Education and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. She has served as President of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ICLS), Chair of the AAAS Education Section, and on the boards of the AAAS, the Educational Testing Service Graduate Record Examination, the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Education Practice, and the National Science Foundation Education and Human Resources Directorate.

Marcia earned her PhD at Stanford University where she worked with Lee Cronbach. She spent a year in Geneva working with Jean Piaget, a year in Israel as a Fulbright Professor, and a year in London at University College. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences three times. Her books include Computers, Teachers, Peers (2000), Internet Environments for Science Education (2004), Designing Coherent Science Education (2008), WISE Science (2009), and Science Teaching and Learning: Taking Advantage of Technology to Promote Knowledge Integration (2011) [Chinese Translation, 2015]. She chairs the Technology, Education—Connections (TEC) series for Teachers College Press.

Libby Gerard

Libby Gerard

Research Director

Libby is a Research Scientist and Lecturer in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research examines how innovative learning technologies can capture student ideas and help teachers and principals use those ideas to make decisions about classroom instruction.Libby designs and leads teacher and principal professional development by using student embedded assessment data to inform instructional customization and resource allocation. Prior to being a Research Scientist, Libby was a postdoctoral scholar at UC Berkeley. She also taught preschool and elementary school in Oakland, California, and in Alessandria, Italy. Libby’s research is published in leading peer-reviewed journals including Science and Review of Educational Research.

Jennifer King Chen

Jennifer King Chen

Post-Doctoral Scholar

 

Ady Kidron

Ady Kidron

Post-Doctoral Scholar

Ady received his PhD from the Education Technologies program at the University of Haifa, under the academic supervision of Prof. Yael Kali. His research examines the nature of interdisciplinary thinking and interdisciplinary learning, and their relation to knowledge integration processes within the context of technology-enhanced learning communities.

In addition to his academic research, Adi led a project (a cooperation between LINKS research center and Kadima Mada – World ORT) aiming to implement an instructional model, developed as part of his research, in three Israeli high schools. Teachers from each of these schools are trained to design and enact interdisciplinary study units based on technology-enhanced learning communities. Ady has worked as a professional instructional designer for more than 18 years in different ed-tech companies (e.g. Time To Know, Britannica Knowledge Systems, Edunet/Emblaze, Eduself).

Eliane Wiese

Eliane Wiese

Post-Doctoral Scholar

Elizabeth McBride

Elizabeth McBride

Graduate Student

Beth is a doctoral candidate in UC Berkeley’s Science and Mathematics Education program (SESAME). She is interested in how to support students during engineering projects in developing both scientific understanding and engineering skills. For her dissertation, she is investigating student use of interactive models during the engineering design process of the Solar Ovens curriculum. Beth holds a B.S.E in Earth Systems Science and Engineering and a Masters of Engineering in Applied Climate Science from the University of Michigan.

Emily Harrison

Emily Harrison

Graduate Student

Korah Wiley

Korah Wiley

Graduate Student

Jacqueline Madhok

Jacqueline Madhok

Research Specialist

Jacquie received her PhD from the Graduate Group in Science and Mathematics Education at UC Berkeley in 2006. She works on assessment and evaluation of WISE instructional materials. Jacquie studies the interaction of students’ beliefs about science and science learning and their achievement, as well as diversity, including gender equity.

Technology & Administration

Geoffrey Kwan

Geoffrey Kwan

Software Developer

 

Jonathan Lim-Breitbart

Jonathan Lim-Breitbart

Designer & Developer

 

Hiroki Terashima

Hiroki Terashima

Technology Director

 

David Crowell

David Crowell

Business Administrator

In Memoriam

Robert Tinker

Robert Tinker

Concord Consortium

Robert Tinker, founder and President Emeritus of the Concord Consortium, was internationally recognized as a pioneer in constructivist uses of educational technology. He developed the “probeware” and Network Science concepts and has directed numerous educational research projects funded by the NSF and the Department of Education that have led to widely used improvements in science education. He founded the Concord Consortium and pioneered its early online courses for students and teachers. He spearheaded the development of powerful computational models that generate virtual worlds that students can explore.

Bob was a co-Principal Investigator for the TELS project, PI for the LOOPS project, and played a continual, integral role in the research program and technology development of the WISE team over the years. Bob passed away on June 21, 2017 and is sorely missed by the entire WISE community. He was a true pioneer in the educational technology field and a brilliant, compassionate, and inspiring partner, mentor, and friend. Learn more about Bob’s life and contributions to the world at https://rememberingbob.concord.org/.

Collaborators

James Slotta

James Slotta

Boston College

Jim Slotta has made a prolific career at the intersection of technology and education. His expertise in technology-enhanced learning, STEM inquiry curriculum, knowledge media, and smart classrooms has earned him international recognition, and his research has yielded scores of books and scholarly articles. Jim was a Principal Investigator of the original TELS project and has worked on WISE since its inception, leading development of the original technology and infrastructure and helping to drive WISE research programs.

Slotta currently works as a professor and Associate Dean for Research at Boston College. He also founded and remains active in ENCORE lab, a research group of teachers and students focused on collaborative and collective forms of inquiry learning. His research has been funded by NIH, NSF, and universities around the world, and it has yielded WISE; KCI: Knowledge Community and Inquiry; and Common Knowledge, a research environment for scripting and orchestrating collective inquiry.

Doug Kirkpatrick

Doug Kirkpatrick

UC Berkeley

 

Hsin-Yi Chang

Hsin-Yi Chang

Taiwan Tech

Hsin-Yi Chang is a professor in the Graduate Institute of Digital Learning and Education at the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech). She is a former post-doctoral scholar with WISE. While at Berkeley, Hsin-Yi explored the use of computer-based dynamic visualizations to support students in learning science and examined how dynamic visualizations can affect student learning and understanding of science concepts. She designed instructional practices to incorporate learning technologies into science curricula.

Jennifer Chiu

Jennifer Chiu

University of Virginia

Jennifer Chiu is an associate professor in the Dept. of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education at the University of Virginia.

Douglas Clark

Douglas Clark

University of Calgary

Doug Clark is the Werklund Professor of Design-Based Learning at University of Calgary and was director of the SURGE project. Clark’s research investigates the design of digital learning environments and the learning processes through which people, particularly middle school and high school students, come to understand core science and computer science concepts in the context of those digital learning environments. This work focuses primarily on conceptual change, inquiry, modeling, digital games, explanation, collaboration, and argumentation. More information about this research can be found at www.dougclark.info and papers can be requested by email.

Dermot Donnelly

Dermot Donnelly

Fresno State University

Dermot F. Donnelly is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Education at Fresno State and an Assistant Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center (SMEC), specializing in the role of instructional technologies to support enhanced student ownership and understanding of scientific concepts. Such instructional technologies include simulations, virtual labs, and online science learning environments. Other research interests include curriculum development and evaluation, professional development of teachers, and power dynamics in science classrooms. He continually seeks innovative ways to make science accessible and engaging for all students through his research and teaching.

Dr. Donnelly earned his Ph.D. at the University of Limerick, Ireland, where he worked with Dr. John O’Reilly and Dr. Oliver McGarr. He spent a year at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, collaborating with Dr. Suzanne Boniface and Dr. Anne Hume, and 3 years as a post-doctoral scholar with Marcia Linn and the WISE group.

Camillia Matuk

Camillia Matuk

New York University

Camillia Matuk is Assistant Professor of Educational Communication and Technology at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. She designs and studies the role of technology in teaching and learning. Her work examines how online tools can be integrated into inquiry-based environments to enhance students’ collaborative learning of science concepts. She also investigates professional development as a context for participatory design, particularly in support of teachers designing tools to support their practice, and customizing their instruction to address students’ needs. More recently, she has begun to explore processes and supports for learning through co-design within game-based learning environments in after school and professional development programs.

Camillia has a background in biology, biomedical illustration, and learning sciences, as well as professional experience as a medical illustrator and animator. Prior to joining the NYU faculty, she was a post-doctoral researcher with the WISE group. On the VISUAL project, Camillia helped design and research how technology-enhanced visualizations can support students’ learning and engagement in science.

Kevin McElhaney

Kevin McElhaney

SRI International

Kevin McElhaney is Senior Researcher of science and engineering education in SRI’s Center for Technology in Learning. He conducts design, implementation, and evaluation research on curricula, assessments, and teacher professional development in K-12 across the science, engineering, and computer science disciplines. Of particular interest are the alignment of technology-enhanced curriculum materials, instructionally supportive assessments, and professional development opportunities with national frameworks and standards, such as the Framework for K-12 Science Education, the K-12 Computer Science Framework, and the Next Generation Science Standards. Dr. McElhaney’s current work integrates the disciplines of science, engineering, and computer science by anchoring authentic engineering design problems and computational thinking tasks to project-based investigations of science phenomena, problems, and issues.

Prior to joining SRI, McElhaney was a postdoctoral scholar and graduate researcher with the WISE group and was a fellow of the Technology Enhanced Learning in Science (TELS) Center, working on the VISUAL and CLASS NFS-funded research projects. He also taught high school mathematics and science for five years in California and Missouri and conducted materials research in the Microsystems Technology department at Intel Corporation.

Yael Kali

Yael Kali

University of Haifa

Yael Kali is an associate professor of technology-enhanced learning at the Technologies in Education Graduate Program, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, and the director of the Learning In a NetworKed Society (LINKS) Israeli Center of Research Excellence (I-CORE). Using design-based research (DBR) and design-based implementation research (DBIR), Kali explores technology-enhanced learning and teaching at various levels, from junior high school to higher education. Together with her students of the TEL Design group  she studies the role of design, and design principles for supporting Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL), and for teacher professional development, in a Teachers as Designers (TaD) approach. Kali has been a faculty member at the Department of Education in Technology and Science at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology for seven years, and was a Co-PI at the Technology Enhanced Learning in Science (TELS) Center, headquartered at the University of California, Berkeley. She has also served as a visiting scholar at the Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning & Cognition (CoCo) in the Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney. Since 2012, Kali has been serving as an Associate Editor for the journal Instructional Science.

Lydia Liu

Lydia Liu

ETS

Dr. Ou Lydia Liu is Senior Director of Research in Higher Education at the Educational Testing Service and assumes overall responsibility for research in higher education and workforce. Dr. Liu has conducted extensive research in student learning outcomes (SLO) assessment. She is also a PI or co-PI on four NSF-funded grants on innovative science assessment and automated scoring. Dr. Liu has published over 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals in the fields of applied measurement, science education, and higher education. Her research appeared in ScienceEducational Researcher, and other influential outlets. Dr. Liu received the 2011 National Council on Measurement in Education Jason Millman Promising Measurement Scholar Award in recognition of her original and extensive research in learning outcomes assessment in higher education and K-12 science assessment. Dr. Liu holds a doctorate in Quantitative Methods and Evaluation from the University of California, Berkeley.

Anna Rafferty

Anna Rafferty

Carleton College

Anna Rafferty is an assistant professor at Carleton College in Computer Science. She finished her PhD at the University of California, Berkeley, in May 2014. Her recent work has been most concerned with how to apply machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques to improve education. Her projects have included developing algorithms to automatically diagnose students’ understanding from their actions as well as more applied projects related to improving chemistry learning in the classroom. If you want to see some of these algorithms in action, check out Emmy’s Workshop, a website Anna and her collaborators developed to help people practice their algebra skills. In the past, she’s also worked in natural language processing.

Anna also loves teaching and working with students. She has taught many courses, including intro to computer science, data structures, mathematics of computer science, computability and complexity, artificial intelligence, and computational models of cognition. She also advises senior comps projects.

Elisa Stone

Elisa Stone

UC Berkeley

Elisa Stone is Director of CalTeach, a program for undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors at the University of California, Berkeley interested in exploring a career in education. CalTeach offers the Science and Math Education minor as well as a unique opportunity for students to complete both a bachelor’s degree and a California teaching credential as an undergraduate.

Elisa teaches in the CalTeach program and enjoys talking about K–12 teaching as a career. A former high school biology teacher and molecular and cell biology researcher, she continues to be interested in student development of scientific experimental skills. She has an MA in education, a PhD in genetics, and a single-subject teaching credential in biology. Elisa was a student fellow with the WISE group as a graduate student and continues to work with WISE as an advisor.

Alumnae

Lauren Applebaum

Lauren Applebaum

Museum of Science & Industry

Lauren received her PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Chicago. During her postdoctoral work with WISE, Lauren designed a unit on self-propelled vehicles as part of the PLANS grant. Self-propelled vehicles, or “Scooters” as it was commonly called, combined student investigations using computer models and hands-on investigations to explore concepts related to energy. As part of the Scooters unit, Lauren collaborated with other members of the WISE team to design computer models that directly connected the virtual explorations on the computer with the hands-on explorations in the classroom. Currently, Lauren works at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago as a senior evaluator.

Britte Cheng

Britte Cheng

SRI International

Britte H. Cheng, Ph.D., is a senior education researcher at SRI International’s Center for Technology in Learning. She is the Principal Scientist at CTL and Co-Lead of the Technology-Enhanced Assessments and Learning Research Group. Britte’s research focuses on the design and impact of learning technologies, instruction and assessment in K-12 math and science. Her work considers systemic issues of educational practice and policy, including the investigation of processes and designs that cross learning contexts and settings.

Kihyun "Kelly" Ryoo

Kihyun "Kelly" Ryoo

University of North Carolina

Kihyun “Kelly” Ryoo is an Assistant Professor in the Learning Sciences and Psychological Studies program in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She received her Ph.D. in Learning Sciences and Technology Design with a specialization in Science Education from Stanford University, where she also earned her M.A. in Learning, Design and Technology.

Her research focuses on promoting equity for linguistically diverse students, particularly English Language Learners (ELLs), in science education through the design and use of technology. She is interested in the role of technology in supporting linguistically diverse students’ science learning aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Supported by the NSF CAREER grant, her most current research explores 1) how interactive visualization technologies can engage ELLs in language-intensive science practices while making sense of science, 2) how interaction data from visualizations can be used to guide ELLs’ science learning, and 3) how to help science teachers develop effective strategies to support ELLs.

Ji Shen

Ji Shen

University of Miami

Ji is an associate professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Miami’s School of Education & Human Development.

A former TELS postdoctoral scholar, Ji revised and developed the TELS high school electrostatics project and studied the use of web-based technology in enhancing students’ integrated understanding of physics concepts in everyday phenomena. He also collaborated with Mills College on policy studies that focused on scaling up technology-enhanced science curriculum.

Vanessa Svihla

Vanessa Svihla

University of New Mexico

Vanessa is an assistant professor at the University of New Mexico. She holds appointments in the Learning Sciences and in the School of Engineering. She received her PhD from The University of Texas at Austin in 2009 in Science Education. She was a post-doctoral scholar on the CLEAR project, where her research interests included understanding how students and teachers might learn from design experiences, and the design of learning experiences that integrate assessment into learning in authentic ways. As part of CLEAR, Vanessa oversaw the analysis of student learning across projects, developed assessments for projects, and in particular, designed the Global Climate Change project. To complement the quantitative methods employed, Vanessa developed case studies of students and teachers using CLEAR projects. Her current research focuses on how people frame design problems and how they learn as they do so.

Charissa Tansomboon

Charissa Tansomboon

Facebook

Charissa is a UX researcher working on Facebook. She works to understand people’s needs and drives the development of technology that best supports them. Before Facebook, she completed a PhD in Human Development and Education at UC Berkeley researching student motivation with WISE. Prior to that, she studied Human Biology and Psychology at Stanford.

Keisha Varma

Keisha Varma

University of Minnesota

Keisha is a professor at the University of Minnesota. Her research program explores the cognitive processes that underlie science learning. In her work, she investigates students’ understanding of complex science concepts and how technology can facilitate science learning. She works at the intersection of educational psychology, cognitive science, and the learning sciences, examining learning and cognition in technology-enhanced classroom settings. A theme throughout her research is examining K-12 students’ representations of complex systems. Her work shows that technology can enhance students’ learning behaviors and improve their representations for complex systems. Her current interests focus on using multiple methodologies to measure students’ representations of complex scientific systems as she analyzes the relationship between students’ interactions with scientific visualizations and their learning outcomes. Additionally, she is interested in studying teacher knowledge development. She is currently looking at ways to leverage psychological methodologies to understand changes in teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge and their representations of effective teaching practice.

Jonathan Vitale

Jonathan Vitale

School District of Philadelphia

Jonathan Vitale is a former postdoctoral scholar with the WISE group. Jonathan worked on a range of projects, including CLEAR, VISUAL, CLASS, GRIDS, and PLANS. Jonathan focused his research on developing automated tools for guiding students use of graphs and diagrams. He also helped the WISE team develop many interactive simulations. Jonathan received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Science in Education from Teachers College. He now works for the School District of Philadelphia as a Software Developer and Data Coach. He builds interactive data displays to help administrators make data-driven school policy decisions. Jonathan lives in Collingswood, New Jersey with his wife and three children.